Commensality Through a Solar Cult. Ceramics, Social Practices and Symbolism Along the Atlantic Coast (2500-1650 BC) - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Book Sections Year : 2022

Commensality Through a Solar Cult. Ceramics, Social Practices and Symbolism Along the Atlantic Coast (2500-1650 BC)

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Abstract

The Bell Beaker phenomenon is characterised by new forms of ritual practices especially known through the study of Bell Beaker graves. These contexts are linked to the representation of individuals who represent elites of those Neolithic societies. Within the complex chiefdoms of the Early Bronze Age, social practices seem to acquire a collective dimension from which new social behaviours emerge. By extension, many domestic ceramic sets display particular organisations related to meaningful gestures and practices. At this time, the ceramic artefact itself is renewed in terms of forms and ornamentations. A significant number of vessels are associated with multiple handles, allowing more complex social interactions. New decorative schemes can be interpreted as astral (solar and lunar) representations. In Atlantic France, these representations undergo a major development during the Bronze Age and seem closely linked to ritual and social practices. They carry major symbolic features and the organisation of the scenery, linked to the relationship maintained between the user and the assistants, probably plays a major role in these collective events. This article will be the occasion to discuss the evolution of these practices, during particular and meaningful occasions but also in daily activities.
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Dates and versions

hal-03782884 , version 1 (21-09-2022)

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  • HAL Id : hal-03782884 , version 1

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Théophane Nicolas, Julien Ripoche. Commensality Through a Solar Cult. Ceramics, Social Practices and Symbolism Along the Atlantic Coast (2500-1650 BC). The Bell Beaker Culture in All its Forms, Archaeopress Archaeology, pp.291-304, 2022. ⟨hal-03782884⟩
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